Athletics - UNLV
UNLV Sports Medicine
ERGOGENIC AIDS AND NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS JULY 28, 1992

Due to the increasing number of student athletes who are taking substances that purport to improve athletic performance "legally and naturally", the following guidelines should be adhered to prior to the recommendation, purchase, and distribution of ergogenic aids.

  1. All athletic department administrators, strength and conditioning coordinators, coaches, athletic trainers, student athletes and any other athletic department personnel, must adhere to current NCAA medical information about ergogenic aids and nutrition. ( NCAA Policy No. 21)

  2. Compounds that are purchased from "nutrition" stores or mail-order catalogs may not be subject to the Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations. Therefore, the contents of these compounds are not known and are not represented accurately on the list of ingredients. IN ADDITION, MOST OF THESE COMPOUNDS HAVE LITTLE OR NO POSITIVE INFLUENCE ON EXERCISE PERFORMANCE.

  3. Some of these compounds or substances contain small amounts of banned substances such as testosterone or other anabolic steroids, or may be anabolic steroids, but not labeled as such. The Allen and Hanburys Athletic Drug Reference is the complete manual that lists all NCAA and USOC banned drugs and/or substances. The A&H Athletic Drug Reference is on file in the athletic training room. In addition, the A&H Athletic Drug Reference personal computer program is also available. These references and all supplemental updates should be utilized prior to committing to particular products.

  4. USE OF THESE AND ALL SUBSTANCES ARE AT THE RISK OF THE STUDENT ATHLETE. A POSITIVE URINALYSIS FOR ANABOLIC STEROIDS OR TESTOSTERONE/EPITESTOSTERONE AT A RATIO GREATER THAT 6 TO 1 (6:1 IS THE CURRENT NCAA LIMITS) OR METABOLITE IS STILL CONSIDERED A POSITIVE TEST, REGARDLESS OF THE PRODUCTS, SUBSTANCES OR COMPOUNDS INGESTED BY THE STUDENT ATHLETE.

  5. It is not possible for the intercollegiate athletic administration, team physicians, drug program coordinator, and the NCAA drug testing committee to determine the student athlete's intent when he or she tests positive for a banned substance. Many student athlete's will deny the use or substances. The appeal process is designed to afford the student athlete the opportunity to present MEDICAL INFORMATION about the use of banned substances. STUDENT ATHLETES WHO HAVE APPEALED POSITIVE DRUG TESTS ON THE BASIS THAT THEY DID NOT KNOW THE SUBSTANCES THEY WERE TAKING CONTAINED BANNED DRUGS HAVE NOT BEEN SUCCESSFUL.

  6. The purchasing, distribution, and/or experimentation with any ergogenic aid must be approved by the Director of Athletic Training/Drug Program Coordinator and the Director of Intercollegiate Athletics. Procedures for approval will include but may not be limited to urinalysis sampling, blood analysis, and the presentation of documented, scientific, FDA approved literature.

REFERENCES:
Cowart, V. "Dietary Supplements, alternatives to Anabolic Steroids", Physician and Sportsmedicine. 20 (3): 189 198, 1992.

Hossler, P. and Kleinschmidt, D. and McCormick, M. and Starr, L. "Ergogenic Aids: The Athletic Trainer's Perspective", Roundtable, Sports Science Exchange, Gatorade Sports Science Institute. Fall 1991.

NCAA Memorandum, "Ergogenic Aids and Nutrition", July 1, 1991.

Peterson, M. and Peterson K. Eat to Compete A Guide to Sports Nutrition. Chicago: Year Book Medical Publishers, Inc., 1988.

Rosenberg, J. and Fuentes, R. and Davis, A. Allen & Hanburys Athletic Drug Reference. Durham: Clean Data Inc., 1992.


POLICY NO. 21:
ERGOGENIC AIDS AND NUTRITION
JANUARY 1990

Athletes continue to search for that nutritional ingredient that will give them a competitive edge: thus, the concept of ergogenic aids has arisen. A nutritional ergogenic aid is defined as any substance or procedure that either improves or is thought to improve physical performance. An ergogenic aid may ostensibly act to help maintain a competitive body weight, increase body energy stores, enhance the biochemical reactions for energy utilization or prevent fatigue.

Commonly advertised nutritional supplements include vitamins, minerals, amino acids, special proteins and herb extracts. By far, the majority of studies have revealed that such ergogenic aids have little or no positive influence on exercise performance and that they may be physiologically detrimental to the athlete's well being. Nevertheless, performance enhancing dietary manipulations have been demonstrated. Examples include carbohydrate loading, use of carbohydrate and electrolyte solutions during prolonged endurance events, appropriate fluid intake and the intelligent selection and timing of precompetition meals.

When athletes consume a sufficient variety of foodstuffs to provide adequate calories, carbohydrate, protein, fat, vitamins and minerals, there appears to be no valid reason for consuming supplements if sound dietary practices are followed. Appropriate foods can be selected at grocery stores and supermarkets without restoring to purchases at drugstores or specialty shops. A possible exception is iron, which may have to be taken as a supplement by some athletes, but this supplementation should not take place unless a need for extra iron is documented by appropriate biochemical and clinical evaluation.

Proper nutrition like training, requires careful long term planning specific competitive objectives in mind. There are no shortcuts to sound nutrition and the use of suspected or advertised ergogenic aids will, in most instances, provide competitive advantage.

REFERENCES

Buskirk, E.R. Some nutritional considerations in the conditioning of athletes. Annual Review of Nutrition. 1:319 350, 1981.

Fox, E.L., R.W. Bowers and M.L. Foss. The Physiological Basis of Physical Education and Athletics. 4th Ed. Dubuque, Iowa: William C. Brown, 1988.

Lamb, D.R. Physiology of Exercise: Responses and Adaptations, 2nd Ed. New York: Collier Macmillan Publishers, 1984.

Wadler, G.I. and B. Hainline. Drugs and the Athlete. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Co., 1989.

Wells, C.L. Women, Sport and Performance: A Physiological Perspective. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics Publishers, Inc., 1985.

Williams, M.H. Nutrition for Fitness and Sport, 2nd Ed. Dubuque, Iowa: William C. Brown, 1988.


AMENDMENTS OR MODIFICATONS TO THE PROGRAM

The UNLV Department of Intercollegiate Athletics Drug Education, Testing Program may be modified or amended, with the approval of the President of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, prior to the beginning of each succeeding academic year. Such amendments or modifications shall apply to, and be effective for, all student-athletes in the UNLV intercollegiate athletic programs upon notice and acknowledgment by such student-athletes of the UNLV Department of Intercollegiate Athletics Drug Education, Testing and Treatment Program as so amended or modified.

PARTICIPATION BY NON-ATHLETES

Non-athletes who may wish to participate in a program similar to that described herein may do so by contacting the Program Director for referral for substance abuse treatment or educational programs. Those non-athletes wishing to participate in the drug testing phase of this program should also contact the Drug Program Coordinator. (The cost of drug testing shall be borne by the individual or the individual's sponsoring department requesting such testing.)

At the beginning of each academic year and before the student-athlete is allowed to train or compete, he/she will be expected to sign the Consent to Testing and Authorization for Release of Information Form.

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS
INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT
NUTRITIONAL / DIETARY SUPPLEMENT POLICY

SUPPLEMENT POLICY

Adopted July 1, 2005

In accordance with the ADVISORY from the NCAA and with the current UNLV Department of Intercollegiate Athletic Department policy on Ergogenic AID and Dietary Supplements, the UNLV Department of Intercollegiate Athletics does not provide, endorse or approve nutritional or dietary supplements for use by student-athletes.

Accordingly, "many nutritional/dietary supplements contain NCAA banned substances. In addition, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not strictly regulate the supplement industry; therefore purity and safety of nutritional/dietary supplements cannot be guaranteed. Impure supplements may lead to a positive NCAA drug test. The use of supplements is at the student-athlete's own risk." (ADVISORY on Nutritional/Dietary Supplements, March 8, 2005)

Therefore, the student-athletes assume all responsibility for the use of nutritional or dietary supplements. IGNORANCE TO THIS RULE IS NO EXCUSE FOR A POSITIVE DRUG TEST. The NCAA subscribes to the Resource Exchange Center, REC, to provide confidential resource for student-athletes and athletics staff who have questions about nutritional/dietary supplements. The REC may be contacted at www.drugfreesport.com/rec or toll free at 877-202-0769. The password for internet access is ncaa1.

Should you have any questions or need additional information, student-athletes should contact their athletic trainer or team physician.

 
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